watercolor of flowers by emily weil

daily painting | simple bouquet

I have a delightful student who takes private painting lessons from me. We sat outside in the comfortable, smoke-free October air and worked on a bouquet I had brought for subject matter. We both enjoyed painting in a smaller format; we worked side-by-side as we practiced various watercolor techniques. I finished this one up today.

As we were working two Cooper’s hawks flew overhead (they like the cottonwood trees bordering my marina). It was glorious. If you are a bird nerd like I am now is a great time to visit Hawk Hill in the Marin Headlands to see the hawks, eagles and falcons migrating; they funnel through that area, heading south to winter in Southern CA, Mexico, and Central and South America. It’s quite spectacular (mid-day is best).

6″ x 6″ ink, watercolor on paper = $45

 

 

 

watercolor of leaf by emily weil

daily painting | september leaf

I was cleaning up this image in Photoshop, created yesterday, when I realized the leaf is heart-shaped. I had a ball (as usual) with our Brushes by the Bay artists group, and stayed after the group dispersed to keep playing with paints. This leaf drifted from trees behind me onto my work space and I changed direction from painting the small bouquet I’d brought to do this simple autumn offering. I am encouraged — my heart is OK. I’m healing.

I love this time of year. Hawks are migrating, the air is cooling, days are getting shorter which means better rests at night. Maybe it is wisps of memories of forever hopes from childhood that my October birthday will be fun. Maybe it is memories of kid excitement for a new school year with unknown possibilities. Dunno. But this heart-leaf comforts me in my time of grief. To everything there is a season.

7″ x 7″ ink, watercolor on paper = $65

 

 

 

abstract painting by emily weil

daily painting | tumbles, bumbles and rumbles

A large fan set on low is starting to blow away the grief fog. It’s not super close, but it’s on. I can feel the cooling, gentle breeze. Waking up in the morning is less dreary (today’s bonus — images in my head from an early morning dream when I was making out with Brad Pitt). I look forward to the events of my day more than I have in many months. Hope drifts around my body in little wisps. I have not posted much lately, as I’ve been working on this large painting in my studio. Also my gut is sometimes wonky and occasionally I have to just take a nap instead of getting my watercolors out. Oh well. But I want to tell you this story. 

The other day I sanded down a plank of wood to use as a shelf for my TV. I rooted around in my cupboard for a leftover can of wood stain I was certain I had, but, nope. Not there. Mumbling and grumbling (I was happy to just stay home all day), I headed to the local hardware store. Near my house, I saw a gorgeous adult red-shouldered hawk in a tree so I stopped to admire its beauty before it flew off (I swear those birds were designed by Walt Disney). After securing my small can of Minwax® Gel Stain, I drove home and set up a spot on my porch to apply the stuff to the wood. Then, a hawk calling! I recognized the call of a red-shoulder. It was nearby, so I tried to spot it — it was atop my neighbor’s sailboat mast, supervising my work, for sure. When I took out my binos to look for the vocalizing bird, I saw another hawk atop the cement silos in my parking lot — a Cooper’s hawk that sometimes sits there (which may explain the red-shoulder’s calls, perhaps territorial). I was sandwiched by two hawks, watching over me; the bird on the mast may have been the bird I spotted earlier in the tree. I was thrilled and glad I had to go to Pagano’s Hardware. The presence of these birds! Magnificent and heartening.

62″ x 72″ acrylic, oil pastel on canvas (stretched) = $6100